Sunday, June 1, 2014

The Weekly Update for Sunday, June 1st, 2014

I love Qol. I really, really do.

It has been a very busy week, and I am happy to have finally gotten a little time to myself. I'm on the workbench, this morning, getting yet more of Howard Fielding's ( he of The Tekumel Project) Qol ready for the next game session in two weeks.

You never have enough Qol, I think; they are so satisfying to have on the table, as they are so businesslike and serious. Much better, I think then your usual hordes of undead like Mru'r or Shedra, although I do have quite a few of both handy.

This new batch will look a little different then the first two waves I have; I'm doing some 'stock' figures this time, as well as some little conversions. I have great hopes for these; I really enjoy painting them!!!

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I am still dithering over what to make the actual Underworld out of for the next game session. I'd prefer not to try to do the traditional 'colored masking tape on table top' kind of thing that used to be fashionable in my youth; I'm thinking about slicing up the stocks of 'cobblestone' foam that I have into walls, and then sticking these onto a batch of 'blank' terrain tiles that I had cut to make the 'wet terrain' tile set. Since I have a lot of MDF panels in stock, and it's summer, I can always cut new tiles and make the swamps out of those - this would free up the old tiles, and I could do an article for the blog about how I make things...

7 comments:

  1. You used to use colored masking tape to represent underworld pathways? Did it work well?

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    1. Back in Ye Olden Dayes, the 'high end' of wargame scenery and terrain was the use of colored masking tape to lay down the terrain features on the bare table top. Most of the universe is paved in fake wood-grain, apparently. Green tape marked forests, blue rivers, etc.

      When we started doing Underworld adventures, it just seemed natural to use the same tape for the walls and such of the catacombs. It worked fine on the usual table tops - quick to set up and tear down, and relatively hard to wreck in the course of games. It failed spectacularly on Phil's carpeted game table; the tape pulled up all the dust and lint, but failed to stick to the actual carpet times - it actually pulled them up, and Phil chewed me out for 'wrecking' his beloved table. I just stuck the tiles back down, and we got on with storming the palace of bassa, King of the Black Ssu.

      The eventual solution that we used at Phil's was that I'd come over early, and lay out the table with a huge set of wooden blocks that I had, and we'd game in that. Easy set up and tear down; all we had to do was put the blocks back into place when we jostled them.

      I'm still thinking about how to do this - I'm leaning in the direction of the blocks, just for old times' sake... :)

      - chirine

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  2. That pic reminds me that I have some Qól patiently waiting for paint...

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    1. I understand - Howard does the figures faster then I can paint 'em?

      - chirine

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  3. Whatever decision you make, please post pictures! The Stonehouse temples are nice, aren't they? I know Michelle from Gaming with John McEwan, and have several of her pieces myself. I'd like to hear more about your terrain as I'm always looking for new or different methods I have not used before.

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    1. Thank you! i'll make sure to tell everyone! I'm still dithering; I'm now thinking about trimming up some wood to make the walls. I have two weeks until the game, and so I'll have to have something built by the end of this coming weekend. Or else, The Missus says... :)

      Tim Knight also asked about terrain and scenery ideas, and I will do a longer post on this this weekend, with photos, and then repost it as a 'page' so people can look at it in the future more easily.

      - chirine

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