Wednesday, July 30, 2014

On The Braunstein - A Pause For Questions...



Let's take a short pause for your questions? Anyone? :)

10 comments:

  1. I enjoy reading your blog on the Braunstein, most of the California groups came out of wargaming or weird Diplomacy variations and weren't quite the same.

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    1. From what I know about West Coast gaming, I think you're right. We were very heavily into miniatures, here in the Twin Cities. Everyone wanted to have a sand table in the basement... :)

      - chirine

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  2. Any suggestions for doing a Braunstein space combat game? I have a few ideas for a multiplayer scenario, but with most spaceship rules I'm worried that players who lose initiative will get bored waiting to move or will get blown up before they can move.

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  3. In the game you have been using an example, what are the choices of spells? Does each mage just get the one spell or does he have an arsenal to call upon?

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  4. Chirine, I was hoping you might talk a little about the actions that take place in a Braunstein. This question may seem a little off target, but in traditional wargames the rules (more specifically, the turn) dictates what can happen when. It usually revolves around move, missiles, melee, and morale. Since Braunsteins are more based on player interaction, there must be some form to the game that encourages it. I'm thinking dialogue, subterfuge, and alliances here. Thing that move beyond a traditional wargame. When and how does this take place in the game?

    I read with great interest how Dave Arneson portrayed himself as an undercover CIA agent in order to avoid capture and to further his in-game goals. This was real tactical role playing.

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    1. I'll address your question in the next post - see above... :)

      Yes, Dave really got into any game roles that he played. His Captain Harchar, in Prof. Barker's campaign, was a marvel!!!

      - chirine

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  5. thanks for the series.
    So (given that the Braunstein involves players resolving competing goals) some of those goals are mutually compatible and some are mutually incompatible.
    do you have any advice for how many of each makes for a good game?

    Do you start with a situation (e.g., shipwrecked sisters), then add particular types of goals? ... and how does the number of players interact with their number and type?
    Any rules of thumb ?

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    1. I'll get to this in my next post - have a look!

      - chirine

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