Sunday, September 28, 2014

The Weekly Update For Sunday, September 28th, 2014 - That Was The Week That Was...


Chirine's astrolabe, which was a gift from my kids...

I am back, after a very long and very busy week. It didn't help that I caught a chill last Saturday, while out in the storm, and was under the weather Sunday through Tuesday. Let me backtrack a bit, if I may, and fill in the gaps...

First off, I'd like to thank everyone who commented and e-mailed about how they do and don't use miniatures in their games. What struck me about your responses, as well as that of the OSR bloggers, is that you all noted that it's all about your individual play styles - and not that of what somebody is supposed to have decreed in the pages of "The Dragon", years ago.

Well, yes! This is, to me anyway, what it's all about. Your play style is what should be driving how you play; what you enjoy is what you game, is my theory. As one commenter put it, 'the OSR' is made up of many camps, and I think he's right; gaming should be, in my mind, a big enough tent to allow for a lot of things. In my own experience:

Dave really liked to use miniatures, and did so whenever he could;
Phil liked to make miniatures, and used them as appropriate to the game situation;
Gary didn't like to use miniatures, and didn't.

I think that covers the entire spectrum, really.

So. last Saturday, I worked the football game here in the Twin Cities - it's overtime, and it pays for the medical bills. We had a pretty severe storm come through during the game, which gets the adrenaline going when you have 42,000 people in an open-air roofless stadium with fifty to seventy mile-per-hour winds, damaging hail, and heavy rain predicted - and predicted to hit in about forty minutes, at that.

Here in the Twin Cities, we have a tradition of what's called 'tailgating', where people party in the parking lots outside the stadium before and after the game; people grill and have fun, and they bring these nice 'lawn tents' which are expandable frames with fabric tops on them. (Which we could have used on the Northwest and Northeast Frontier campaigns with Phil, but I don't think they'd been invented yet.) I will leave it to your imaginations what happens to these tents / awnings / gazebos when winds like we got during the storm hit them; in order to minimize the damage, I was sent around in my little electric cart - I do 'Motorist Assistance' calls, which means I do jump-starts, perform miracles in lock-outs, and fix flat tires; a disabled vehicle plays havoc with traffic flows, so we try to clear them as fast as we can - to warn folks to take precautions. It seems to have worked; we had something like fifty tents up and going in the flat lots around the stadium, and only three were lost due to the high winds. The Stadium Operations crew did evacuate the stadium; but, this being Minnesota where we are made of sterner stuff due to our Scandinavian roots, the game resumed after a 45-minute 'rain delay'.

The downside was that the rain was coming in horizontally, and in sheets; I wound up taking cover under a building portico, as my cart was on the verge of being blown over by the wind. The temperatures dropped like the proverbial rock, as the storm front came through; we went from nearly +80F down to a chilly +60F in less then fifteen minutes, and being soaking wet I got very cold.

As a result, I felt very poorly on Sunday; I did get through my overnight shift, but came home very sick. I spent the next thirty hours flat on my back, with The Missus enforcing a period of bed rest with hefty doses of fluids. I took some sick leave on Monday night, but managed to stagger through Tuesday and Wednesday nights with the aid of powerful potions administered by The Missus.

Thursday was The Missus' turn; she got her stitches from the previous surgery out, and everything looks pretty good. She's still sore, but she's feeling pretty good. I stayed home that night, as we had another appointment on Friday...

... Which was a round of exploratory surgery to try and locate what seems to be a "fibroid tumor" in The Missus' abdominal region. It showed up on an ultra-sound exam, and the doctors went in to have a look around; it's believed to be non-malignant, so there was no rush, but everyone just wanted to make sure. All of us came to the party, but the tumor was a no-show; it wasn't visible. So, The Missus will have a go with the ground-penetrating radar - er, an exam with the MRI machine - to scope out where this thing might be lurking.

Yesterday, I took the day off, and I am feeling better. I'm still working on getting back up to speed, and I'll be getting back to all of you as fast as I can.

***

In other news. the big D&D lawsuit trial is over, for now:


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I have been getting some figures painted, as a way to keep my blood pressure down during these troubled times; pictures when I get the chance...

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Player-characters note! Here's an excellent series by a British newspaper on what we usually call 'encumbrance' in our games:


Back when I went through my 'basic training', I carried literally more then my own body weight in equipment, weapons, ammunition, and supplies; as a result, I got stuck down in the bottom of a ravine and had to be hauled out by the rest of my squad. I was told - in no uncertain terms! - not to do that again, thank you.

***

And , to end on a humorous note, here's a news story I think you'll be amused by:


Honestly, Gentle Readers, I couldn't make this stuff up if I tried...

6 comments:

  1. Good to hear from you again! My best wishes to you and The Missus. I'd seen that series on soldiers' gear. Personally, I'm through with encumbrance rules, and this just reinforces my position. As for the ninjas, remember, *they're out there!*

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    1. Thank you! I'll try to stay as current as I can, too.

      I agree with you about the encumbrance rules in games; we never used to bother with them, out at Phil's in his Tekumel campaigns. If anything, he'd encourage people to load up with stuff, and then offer to make them go up and down the basement stairs with it all on them just to see what would happen.

      We had a lot of fun with this, over the years, especially after we'd gotten some of our suits of armor built as costumes. We got very, very interested in belt pouches, shoulder bags, and knapsacks; and after a while we just didn't carry all that much stuff. We did hire a lot of carts and bearers, though! :)

      - chirine

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  2. Be careful, both of you, and get well soon!!

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    1. Thank you! We'll try! :)

      I haven't forgotten you, either; I have a long reply to your e-mail in draft form, and I'll have it done as fast as I can...

      - chirine

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  3. Sorry to hear you are feeling under the waether. Glad to hear about the progress with your wife's condition as well. I hope the next round of examinations proves that it is not dangerous.

    Honestly I don't care who makes D&D movies as they all have been completely lacking. Poor writing cannot be cured with special effects. They need somebody who loves the game as much as Peter Jackson loved Tolkien to pull it off, I think.

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    1. Thank you for your very kind words! We're both taking it very carefully - we're not as young as we used to be... :)

      I agree with you about the fight over the rights to make a D&D movie; who actually makes it is irrelevant to how good the writing is, and from my experience that's where Hollywood really falls down. (I've had too much experience with producers, over the years!)

      What I find fascinating is that two major studios would put so much money into a court fight over such a 'niche' property - I did have to wonder what the studio execs were thinking... :)

      - chirine

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